More US law enforcement agencies buy devices that can “hack” the iPhones

- Adrian Ungureanu
1074

Well, since there have been some incidents in which Apple didn’t wanted to help the US authorities to unlock the devices of some terrorists, like the San Bernadino case, when 14 died and 22 were seriously injured, the US authorities decided to step up.

As they were denied by Apple, who said that the iOS can’t be hacked, FBI paid like $900.000 to “hackers” to unlock the San Bernadino terrorist’s device. Apple asked the FBI to tell them how the iOS was hacked. FBI refused. Apple took the matter to the court, but the US justice denied Apple’s requests, so FBI doesn’t have to the Apple a thing about how the iOS was hacked.

Anyway, that a pretty much expensive way to unlock one single device. Now, an US company, GreyShift is making GreyKey box, a device that that be used to unlock iPhone. The “cheaper” version costs $15.000 and it required to be physically connected to the iPhone it must unlock, but there is a more expensive version, that costs $30.000, which doesn’t need a direct connection, that can be used anywhere and can unlock an unlimited number of devices.

Now, it is reported that more and more US agencies are buying them. The FBI seems to have it, most likely CIA has it too. But it is a known fact that the Maryland State Police already bought them, as well as the US State Department, the Secret Service also got some. The Drug Enforcement Administration has expressed interest.

The Indiana State Police, and the Miami-Dade County Police have purchased or are soon purchasing GrayKey technology, while other forces like the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department have looked into boxes and received quotes from GrayShift.

So, there are dark times coming for Apple. The cybersecurity on iOS was the best among mobile platforms, but since such devices are going to roam on the streets like that, I highly doubt that such a technology won’t get in wrong hands. So, there’s just a matter a time before Apple’s device begin to be hacked and cracked more often that Apple ever imagined.